medicine wheel patterns = huge hit

Updates: I just finished my 8th week with the students. I currently teach from the beginning of the morning until recess (9-10:20), put out invitations for centre time (11:10-11:40), cover Book Look/Word of the Day and Math (12:45-1:45 ish) and do end of the day/library routines (2:45-3:30). Next week, I pick up Phys Ed (1:45-2:30) and the week after, I start my 3 week block of full time teaching.

Here are some of the highlights from my week:

Treaty Ed = loving it!

My Treaty Ed infused lessons have been my absolute favourite so far in my internship (which makes me even more excited to attend the Treaty Ed Camp in Regina on November 7th – check out the event and register here). Both of my lessons (on Promises and the Medicine Wheel) turned out to be not only my best lessons content-wise but the students also loved them! This week, we learned about the Medicine Wheel and its four quadrants. We then placed the four elements, four seasons, and four stages of life into the correct quadrant. Then we made a Medicine Wheel with our bodies (and some coloured sweaters) and stood up/sat down as our quadrant’s season, colour, stage of life, or element was said. This lesson was so cool and the students were so engaged and into it – they really soaked up the Medicine Wheel quadrants and teachings!

We learned that the four quadrants can stand for the four seasons, the four elements, and the four stages of life (among other things!).

We learned that the four quadrants can stand for the four seasons, the four elements, and the four stages of life (among other things!).

We made a Medicine Wheel with our classmates! When I called one quadrant's colour, season, element, or stage of life, they stood up! This made a pattern.

We made a Medicine Wheel with our classmates! When I called one quadrant’s colour, season, element, or stage of life, they stood up! This made a pattern.

Phys Ed = such a struggle for me

Next week, I pick up Phys Ed full time and, if I am being completely honest, this is definitely a worry for me. I find Phys Ed to be the hardest subject area to manage (and unlike the older grades, we have it slotted in every single day – which is great for this age group but difficult for me). I know lots of teachers just see Phys Ed as ‘filler’ time and they don’t really look at the curriculum, but this is a goal of mine. I will be doing the manipulative skills unit on sending and receiving, and am excited, but nervous. I think this will definitely be a growth area for my 3 week block and I hope to have my cooperating teacher in during this time to observe me and offer tips for success. The redeeming thing about Phys Ed, however, is that the kids love this time of the day no matter what we do, so at least they will be excited and engaged (sometimes they are just a little bit TOO excited).

EYE testing = time off of teaching

I have finished up the daunting task of EYE tests this week – hooray! The scores are ready to input. Doing this testing gave me some time off of teaching the whole class and to spend one-on-one time with students. However, I found that it definitely made my day feel longer. I really do love being in the classroom with the whole group dynamic of a classroom. I understand that one-on-one testing is part of a teacher’s job description, but I wouldn’t say that it is my favourite. It seems so much more drawn out and stilted than the fast pace of classroom goings-on.

Disruptive students = I want to help, but don’t know what to do

Last week, I was feeling strong and on top of the world, teaching wise. This week felt like much more of a struggle. I think it is partially because I am picking up classes and noticing how much harder it is to handle the students for an entire day, rather than one hour. Also, I hope that this is because my pedagogy has improved and I am, thus, harder on myself and more critical/expect more.

I am feeling especially frustrated at the end of the day with one group of students, as one in particular ends up sitting apart from the class during some portions of the day since he cannot participate in group instruction at the Story Corner without disrupting the learning of others. I discussed this with my coop teacher, and she reassured me that this is an acceptable action for this student (she does this herself), as he is not learning when he is disruptive, and neither are his classmates around him, so it is just better to remove him from the group. However, this really goes against my teaching philosophy and I feel that I should be doing more to help this student be successful during group instructional time. I am additionally frustrated for my students who are doing what is asked and are wanting and ready to learn but can’t because I have to spend so much energy disciplining and attempting to manage this little learner. To attempt to aid this problem, I have brainstormed a list of possible solutions and strategies to help this student be more successful in the coming weeks – fingers crossed!

Outdoor Explorations = chaotic, but meaningful, learning

Also this week, I did another Treaty Ed/Math lesson where students went outside to gather natural materials to make patterns with. I was so nervous to take my students outside (as we had a sub that day, and she encouraged me to take the students out on my own); at first, I did head counts about every 30 seconds to make sure no one would wander off. I was thoroughly impressed by my students, though. It turns out I had nothing to worry about. They were excited and eager to gather materials. We ended up collecting rocks, sticks, leaves, pinecones, and a few too many ladybugs got into the mix as well. Here are some pictures of my little nature explorers:

Rocks were a popular (and heavy) natural item.

Rocks were a popular (and heavy) natural item.

Picking some grass and green plants growing near the fence.

Picking some grass and green plants growing near the fence.

Getting dressed and undressed to go outside didn't take nearly as long as I originally thought!

Getting dressed and undressed to go outside didn’t take nearly as long as I originally thought!

Making patterns

Making patterns

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Some students liked their nature patterns so much, they asked to take them home in their Ziploc bags. I was thrilled. We also briefly touched on the HCK outcome in Treaty Ed by talking about how we use natural items to suit our needs and how First Nations people thank nature whenever they take something (ex. by leaving tobacco, a special plant, behind). I asked the class how we could possibly say “Thank You” to nature for letting us take some of its items for our use, and one student suggested we leave behind something of ours that is very special to us – how sweet! We ended up just whispering “Thank You” as we picked something up that we liked. I definitely could have gone deeper into this part of the lesson, but students were already afternoon-antsy and wanting to get outside, so we skimmed over this portion of the lesson more than I would have liked. Hopefully we can touch on this again in the future.

Faculty Advisor visits = participation rather than observation

My faculty advisor came for her second visit this week, which went well I am happy to say! I was especially tickled when she asked to participate in my lesson rather than sitting at the back of the room, disengaged and taking notes. I think that this is such a benefit for her, as so much of the learning in Kindergarten is happening through playing and exploring, not just lecture and teacher instruction. It makes me feel like I am doing a good job of making an engaging classroom when she wants to participate in the lesson alongside the students – which is what Kindergarten is really all about!

Week 8, I am both relieved and saddened that you are over. Here’s to an even better Week #9!

-KKF

Oh, P.S., we also painted lady bug rocks this week (which was a fun, yet super hectic experience for me to manage!). They turned out very cute and were part of an emergent curriculum/inquiry project we did after students found lady bugs outside and were fascinated. Screen Shot 2015-10-24 at 7.31.37 PM

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starting patterns and centres so far

Last week, I spent Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday in Regina for a 3 day Internship Seminar for interns and cooperating teachers. That meant only 2 days in the classroom with the students. I ended up seeing some of my students on Friday evening at the school football game and got a chorus of “I misted you!”‘s. While I enjoyed the Internship Seminar and learned a lot (as well as enjoyed time with like-minded adult company), three days without seeing my students was hard! What is especially hard (I found out this week) is coming back to your students after they have had a teacher and a change of pace in the classroom. I have definitely felt extra tired after the past two days – you have to refocus your students and reacquaint them with your routines and expectations.

Today was my first, truly formal lesson and the first in my planned Math unit on Patterns. I introduced the concept of patterns to the students and did a few examples (both by wearing a striped shirt and talking about how the colours of the stripes repeated over and over again, and by pointing to items in patterns I had drawn on chart paper). Then I had the students create patterns with themselves. We made three patterns – dark hair/light hair, hands up/hands down by sides, and boy/girl. The students really enjoyed this kinaesthetic activity! They were also eager to point out patterns on their clothing and in the classroom – I was impressed with how quickly they picked up the concept! I think this will be a very fun unit and am excited for all of the hands-on work I have planned.

My PDP target today was to quickly and effectively manage disruptive and/or off-task students. I started out by teaching the students the Quiet Coyote hand signal (see below – your hand makes a face that looks like a Coyote). This caught on very well! Some of my blurting repeat offenders responded especially well to this strategy – bonus!

Quiet Coyote has his mouth closed and his ears open. I show this to interruptive students.

Quiet Coyote has his mouth closed and his ears open. I show this to interruptive students.

For a busy class, I was very pleased with how well I kept them under control and calm. The lesson, as a whole, was a success and I thought my management was, for the most part, quick and effective. Next time, I am going to work on strategic seating of particular students who may cause disruptions. I also need to tighten up on my management of blurting when students have something relevant to add to the conversation. I have such a hard time telling students to stop when they are adding useful comments to the lesson. This means that I have to remind blurters that, in order to contribute to the discussion, they must do it the right way (by raising their hand and waiting to be called on). I am doing the same lesson and PDP target tomorrow with the other group of students, so I am interested to see how my management will differ between the two groups.

Finally, I just wanted to post a few pictures of the invitations I have done so far:

A full view of my Garden centre. I hid bugs in the soil for students to find, name, sort, count, etc.

A full view of my Garden centre. I hid bugs in the soil for students to find, name, sort, count, etc.

Garden 2 Garden 1

I made a Still Life invitation for Arts Ed. We discussed that Still Lifes are drawings of things that don't move (like flowers, fruit, bowls, etc.).

I made a Still Life invitation for Arts Ed. We discussed that Still Lifes are drawings of things that don’t move (like flowers, fruit, bowls, etc.).

Still Life 2

I included some pictures of famous Still Lifes, like Van Gogh’s “Sunflowers.”

This invitation was a set of Sensory Bins focusing on the 4 seasons.

This invitation was a set of Sensory Bins focusing on the 4 seasons.

I thought this one turned out really well - I love the colours in fall!

I thought this one turned out really well – I love the colours in fall!

Students seemed to really enjoy this centre - they did a great job of sorting the items in the bin.

Students seemed to really enjoy this centre – they did a great job of sorting the items in the bin.

You can't really tell, but I put fake grass on the bottom of this bin and also added in a few bugs.

You can’t really tell, but I put fake grass on the bottom of this bin and also added in a few bugs.

This centre was great because it had natural and real sand. But it was also the messiest!

This centre was great because it the natural material of real sand from the playground. But it was also the messiest!

I also did a centre all about Self Portraits. Each of my students drew their self portrait - they ended up adorable!

I also did a centre all about Self Portraits. Each of my students drew their self portrait – they ended up adorable!

When I first found out I was placed in Kindergarten, I was a bit worried that I would miss out on planning typical lessons in all of the subject areas, as a majority of the subjects in Kindergarten is covered through invitations rather than whole class lessons. However, my faculty advisor really helped to turn my outlook around – she said that K is one of the few grades that has a more holistic and integrated approach to the curriculum. Invitations are all hands-on and experiential – which is an excellent way for students, especially young ones, to learn! I am really enjoying the invitations part of planning; I never know exactly what students will bring to the table in regards to previous knowledge and I am always surprised at the things students do with the materials that I would not have thought of. The open-ended nature of invitations offers constant surprise!

I cannot believe that I already have FOUR weeks of internship under my belt. After teaching a few times, attending my internship seminar, and getting to know my co-op/students better, I am getting very excited to take on more parts of the day as I gear up towards my three week block of full time teaching. I also know that the rest of internship will continue to fly by in the same fashion, so I am doing my best to remember to soak up all of the little moments. Luckily, Kindergarten offers lots of hugs, laughs, and smiles. I cannot help but feel so lucky to be a part of my lovely students’ lives for four months.

Until next time,

-KKF

kindergarten: a whole new world

We had another four day week this past week, due to Labor Day being on Monday. I have to say, it was rather nice to have two four-day weeks with the students – really ease the teachers into it after summer break! All of the students in our two lovely little classes came together for our first full-sized class days this week. I have to say, I am absolutely loving this age – Kindergarten is “a whole new world, a dazzling place I never knew.” (Can I say that on here? – COPYRIGHT goes to Disney!)

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The students have so much love to give and are SO. STINKIN’. CUTE! They are energetic, inquisitive, playful, funny, adorable… The list goes on and on. I love that K allows teachers flexibility in instructional methods – especially the fact that so much learning can be done in a student-centred approach using hands-on exploratory stations at centre time.

This week was my first crack at doing “invitations” (or centres). I definitely learned a lot about managing them – on the first day, I had out 3 at once and quickly realized that I had to jump all over the place to document students’ learning in photograph form. This was NOT productive. The kids hop from centre to centre at such a fast rate, that I felt I was missing so many great learning moments. Thus, after a conversation with my co-op teacher, I decided to just have one centre the subsequent days. I would then sit at that centre and ask key questions to dig a little deeper into the subject matter with students. This also allowed me to have more focused documentation and more closely follow each students’ interaction with the centre.

This week, I decided to have out a gardening centre. I was astounded at some of the information my students were able to give regarding insects, soil, and gardens. Some of the best quotes:

Q: What do bugs do in the garden? “They eat things and squirm around.”

“‘Gardener‘ snakes live in the garden.”

“It’s a worm. Their home is in the dirt. They dig it up.”

“Worms love living in the garden. The dig up the soil and help the flowers grow.”

Student A: “What is this?” Student B: “I think it’s a butterfly.”

I definitely see theory coming into practice in terms of “students have lots of pre-acquired knowledge from their home lives” and “students are capable learners.” I was so impressed with my students’ knowledge. Here are a few pics of them digging in the dirt.

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This little guy showed some great Math skills at a Science centre. This was even before I put out bug counting mats with numbers.

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This little girl, and one other, were great soil detectives! They noticed different particles in the soil itself (round white pieces, light and dark brown pieces, etc.).

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Students already knew what a magnifying glass was, that it was made out of a breakable material, and how to use it! Wow!

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Using the bug counting mat the next day

This week, I also led our daily routines of Calendar/Weather/Leader time on Thursday and Friday. I really like this part of the day – it incorporates so many life skills and curriculum areas! The students are each given a job while we go over the day’s date, days of the week, months of the year, rhyming poems and songs, the day’s weather, classmate’s names, counting (numbers), colours, letters of the alphabet, girls and boys in the class, and leaders sharing their ‘secret item,’ which their peers have to guess. It is a action-packed morning full of routine and structure. I will post a detailed schedule of these routines at a later date.

I also taught a brief math lesson on Taller and Shorter, and a Phys Ed lesson. These both went well also. I am excited to actually start some regular lessons when I begin my Math unit in Patterns next Monday! I am busy planning that as of late and am happy to say that it has a large emphasis on manipulatives and hands-on activities.

Also this week, I attended two volleyball practices and one game. I am helping out with the Jr Girls (Gr 7-9) and Sr Boys (Gr 10-12) volleyball teams and couldn’t be more excited! It is so wonderful to go from playing a sport and loving it, to sharing that passion with others in an effort to help them develop their skills. I also had a chance to make “Raiderade,” the school’s extra-special, homemade beverage reminiscent of Booster Juice, and named after the school team name: Raiders. Members of the staff and student body meet on a regular basis, either before or after school, just to blend up frozen fruit, yogurt, and fruit juice to make amazing concoctions that are sold to the school population, community members, and visitors during sports games and tournaments. I could not believe the huge amount of dedication that this act involves – one of the teachers on staff makes regular trips into Saskatoon to purchase all of the supplies (in one day alone, a group of about 8 people make over 350 cups of Raiderade). The delicious drinks are then sold for $3 a piece, and make the school a huge amount of money. Davidson has not had to have magazine campaigns in years due to the success of Raiderade.

In only 3 weeks of internship, I could not believe just how much extra work educators and school staff take on simply to keep the school running smoothly and successfully. Aside from planning for and teaching 15-25 children at a time, teachers also run sports teams and extracurricular clubs, make schedules and arrange drivers, work in the canteen, spend time communicating with parents, organize/decorate/clean their classroom, go to school council meetings, and spend time with their own families, among countless other things! I think this conversation with one of my fellow interns sums up our thoughts on teacher dedications and commitment (I am the blue messages):

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My choice of future career is reaffirmed each day. I am so excited looking into my future and realizing that no two days will ever be the same, and that I can continually keep challenging myself and growing as an educator, even after 20+ years! I think this is why teaching attracts some of the finest people in the world: it is challenging beyond description, and often mostly thankless and unnoticed, behind-the-scenes work that is constantly changing, demanding, and never-ending. Yet teachers will continue to put their best foot forward and a smile on their face for the students that they strive to inspire, motivate, and teach each day. I think that is truly a magical feat.

-KKF

P.S. My 3 day internship orientation seminar is in Regina next week. I am excited to be back in the capital city (after all, it has been my home for 3 years) and see some of my friends who are embarking on their own internship adventures! I am also happy to be learning more about my role as an intern, and the expectations for my growth and progress through this amazing journey. This is also a chance for my co-op teacher and I to polish a contract for our professional relationship during these 4 months. More soon, I promise!

earning my spots as a future educator: my journey through ECS 210

For this digital storytelling assignment, I decided to take a children’s book approach, with myself being played by the lovely leopard Leerder in the story. I created the pages of my story on a website called StoryBird, took screenshots of the pages on my computer, and added audio voice overs and music to the images in iMovie. I am a huge fan of YouTube, and this is my first original video on my channel. I hope you enjoy coming along on my journey with me!

a recap of my semester in pictures

So, here I am at the end of my third semester here at the U of R… and it feels both amazing and strange. My lovely mother pointed out to me the other day that I only have 4 more semesters at the university (as one will be spent in a school for my internship in my 4th year)! It is crazy to think that after this next semester is over, I will have completed HALF of my DEGREE! I know I haven’t posted in a while, so I thought I would post some photos in order to show you my semester! Enjoy! 🙂

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This is my floor’s bulletin board in residence, which I made for my RA job at the University. In true teacher fashion, I had to make a cute little theme, and later added a speech bubble for the polar bear saying, “The COOLEST place to be!” Puns for the win.

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This is the masterpiece that I made during my “Jackson Pollock Painting” event in residence. This was SO fun to make, and below is what it looked like AFTER the splattering! What a fun (but messy) project to do with younger kids, too! Image

I also had the privilege of watching my alma mater (and my little sister) win volleyball provincials! It was even more exciting, as my hometown was hosting the event AND it was the women’s team’s first time to ever MEDAL – and they got gold! Definitely a proud moment for a veteran Wildcat. 🙂Image

My mentee and I made these crazy ‘foldovers’ and we both had a blast. He is very into zombies and robots, in case you didn’t notice – haha. I remember doing these in art class in school, so I was happy to try it out on my ‘guinea pig’ and it will definitely be a favourite activity for my future classroom. ImageImageImageImageImageImage

We also have played homemade Battleship on paper, which is a fun and easy game that can help with learning grids and cartesian plane coordinates in Math!Image

In between all of these super fun activities, I actually buckled down and got some serious work done – believe it or not! I wrote two term papers and had a binder full of practicum assignments from my KIN 120 class (pictured below).

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Speaking of my KIN practicum, the amazing little guy my partner and I had the privilege to work with gave us these on our very last day. Needless to say, our hearts were melted. Image

During my frequent Instagram scroll-throughs, I found this and fell in love with it. It’s so strange to see these things said in these contexts, but in relation to mental illness, we hear things like this all the time. It really made me step back and think…

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To get into the holiday spirit, my mentee and I made a gingerbread house for our last session together for 2013! It is so hard to believe that another year is almost over. ImageImageAnd finally, in order to celebrate the end of classes, my friend and I dressed up as presents! 🙂 So to anyone who stuck around long enough in order to get to the bitter end of this post: Happy Holidays, or Merry Christmas, or Happy Hanukkah, or Happy Kwanzaa or Happy Whatever-You-Choose-To-Celebrate-Or-Not-Celebrate! Have a lovely holiday season and cheers to a brand new year full of even more awesome memories to come! Image

Sincerely,

-KKF

word of the day

It’s truly amazing the times of day I get the urge to write a blog post. The idea that sparked this post came to me while I was washing my face (I always get my most brilliant ideas when doing the most mundane of tasks – showering, brushing my teeth, washing my face, laying in bed at night, etc…). In one of my previous blogs, I made a goal to expand my vocabulary and realized that I was failing miserably at carrying this goal out. So I have decided to do a test run for Word of the Day during the month of August! I will (hopefully!) be tweeting out my new finds every day, so please check it out on Twitter @kfidelack! I am a big believer in goal setting leading to goal achieving, so fingers crossed that I will follow through!

Maybe I’m crazy in saying this, but I actually feel that I am MORE busy this summer than I was during the school year. Or maybe I just forget what it felt like to be IN school, because it’s been a LONG time! It will be weird to get back in the swing of things. And I don’t think this school year is going to slow down by any means. I have signed up to be an In-School Mentor once a week through Big Brothers of Regina AND have a job as an RA (Residence Assistant) on top of being a full-time student, so I will definitely be busy! Good thing I pride myself in being an expert on time management. I can sleep when I’m dead, right? Never have I found the wish for ‘more hours in day’ as true as in my life after high school – and I was plenty busy then, too! Thankfully, I seem to thrive on keeping occupied so I think the bustling environment of an Elementary School classroom is the perfect niche for me! 🙂

Just a super quick update on tutoring:

It’s going really well – at our last session, my student absolutely nailed his Silent E words, which I have been drilling into him for a few sessions now! He is a very hard worker and I am really starting to see him warming up to me – I think it helps that I can be such a goof to ease his nerves. When we learned how ‘R’ affects vowels, I made up actions to go with them and I think he giggled at my seal noises and clapping for ‘or’!

And to finish, I thought I’d share with you the new word that I learned today: Pareidolia. It’s the ability to see faces where there isn’t one. For example, this sink:

I learned this from a YouTube video on the channel Vsauce. Go check it out! His videos are all very informational and interesting – and his enunciation is superb! (Note: it really is amazing all the educational resources you can find on YouTube – I have used a couple of videos in my tutoring already!)

Until next time, I challenge you to go out and learn something new! It’s truly a gift of life that there is so much for us to learn about this amazing world we live in!

tutoring recap (sessions 1, 2 and 3)

I have had my first three sessions with my new ‘summer student’ and I feel like I have already learned a few good lessons – as well as accumulating a lot more questions, too!

The student is going into Grade 5 in the fall but struggles considerably with reading. Right now, he is only at a mid-Kindergarten level of reading so I am really hoping to enforce the basic rules of reading over the summer so he can continue to grow as a young reader!

He is a very shy young guy, so I feel like he is still warming up to me after 3 sessions, but I hope that he will feel more comfortable with me as we go on! His teacher mentioned to me that he really likes using technology, so I have been researching useful online resources and incorporating a ‘tech’ aspect into every session thus far. He seems to be enjoying it but I think I should be incorporating technology that isn’t just on my laptop. My goal is to download some apps for the iPad and try those as well! Goodness knows how many educational apps are at our fingertips! If you have any suggestions of great apps for inspiring or assisting young readers, please let me know!

I found our first session very helpful in planning for the following meetings because I finally had first-hand experience with how far the student was and what exactly needed to be focused on. I soon realized that the basics of reading still needed reinforcement, so have worked on ‘Silent E’ words and ‘When 2 Vowels Go Walking’ concepts since. His teacher mentioned that he would need continual repetition to solidly grasp a concept, so I hope to keep reviewing these concepts in future meetings. In true future-teacher fashion, I enjoy making up my own little, student-personalized worksheets for my tutoring students, so that has been a good exercise for me to really focus in on what the student needs.

The one thing I found slightly disheartening today was how disinterested he seemed. Granted, no one wants to have to go to ‘school’ during the summer time, but I honestly am trying to throw in as much fun and ‘gamey’ style stuff as I can! Today was a lot of working on rules and worksheets, so maybe I needed to put a few more activity-style items on the agenda! Also, his mom mentioned when she walked in that he was ‘grumpy’ today, so perhaps today was just an unlucky day to have lots of word work rather than games.

Next time, I think I should at least mix up the straight pen and paper stuff with movement or an activity or something so it isn’t a big chunk of ‘the boring.’

One thing I have noticed is that the student really likes to fidget and I made the mistake of putting all the writing utensils in front of him for his use, which just ended up in him playing with the pens and pencils instead of paying attention. Since then, I have tried to keep all the loose items on my side of the table to avoid distraction as much as possible.

Today was our only meeting this week, as I am headed off for my ONLY days off this summer on Thursday! But after my 5-day weekend, you can bet I will be right back to the grind to try and help my student as much as possible!

I realize that this particular student’s growth is very slow and takes a lot of repetition, so I have to make realistic goals and not expect him to improve drastically just from 2 hours/week of work. But I do hope that he can continue to have opportunities to read and doesn’t slip backwards over the summer – which is the sad truth for lots of kids! If I can help to improve his reading repertoire even a little bit, I will have achieved something great!

One last thought before I go…

English is such a weird language where lots of basic rules won’t apply to an unfortunately big number of words. When I think back on myself learning to read, it honestly amazes me that I did it, or that any kid does it for that matter! It is something that is really taken for granted in our society (we automatically assume that EVERYONE can read, and those who can’t are at a major disadvantage). It is really about repeating and repeating and repeating and then repeating AGAIN! Some of the most used words follow no rhyme or reason whatsoever and I think that is one of my other goals for my tutoring is to familiarize my student with these high frequency words that he will use every day!

This got me thinking though… We use the same words ALL THE TIME. And just because I know how to read now, I don’t have any need to expand my vocabulary and learn how to read new words. So I have made a bit of a personal goal to work on expanding my personal vocabulary and actively look up words I don’t know so I am always learning. After all, you can NEVER be too old to learn. And that is a pivotal idea behind being a teacher, don’t you think?