instructor magazine: arts integration

This year, rather than ordering Seventeen magazine from the local high school fundraiser, I decided to get a magazine especially for teachers! I have only gotten two issues so far, but I already love it! One of my favourite ideas in the last issue was using artwork to teach other subjects! 

Arts integration is especially interesting to me, as I am taking an ART 100 class for my Fine Arts elective this semester. As soon as I saw the familiar water lilies painting by Claude Monet (which we covered in my Art class) with a headline for using it to teach a subject other than art, I was hooked! The example in the magazine uses Monet’s piece as an introduction to plants, what they need to survive, and man-made versus naturally occurring parts of the environment (for the other ideas, check out the Winter 2013 issue of Instructor by Scholastic).

It has been stressed in Education to me already that students have multiple intelligences and, often times, the more artistic or outdoorsy types of learners’ learning styles aren’t acknowledged or adapted to as much as the other visual or auditory types. 

This is an inspiring idea for me and as I progress through my program, I will keep my eyes peeled for any further artworks and links to lessons they may have use in my future!

1. Art can have different types of patterns or balance: symmetrical, asymmetrical or radial (radiating out from a centre point of a circular object). Using works with these pattens can be a great visual for math lessons!

This is a great example of symmetry (Sayre, 2012). What is symmetrical in this picture? What is not?


Coronation of the Virgin, Enguerrand Quarton

Here is an artwork containing asymmetry (Sayre, 2012). How is it asymmetrical? How does this piece still contain balance, though?


Boston Common at Twilight, Childe Hassam

This final work is from the Chartes Cathedral in France. It showcases radial symmetry (Sayre, 2012). How is the symmetry of a square different from symmetry in this circular piece?


Rose Window, Chartes Cathedral

Sources:
Sayre, Henry M., A World of Art, 7th Edition. New York: Pearson, 2012.

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